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Advocates in US push new efforts to bring back deportees

MIAMI (AP) — Jesus Lopez says he feels like a stranger in the place he was born. He’s from Guadalajara, Mexico, but his life was in Chicago. After 15 years in the city, he was deported a year ago during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I want to go back because I belong there, that’s where I have my friends, my family,” said the 25-year-old, once a recipient of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that gives protections to immigrants brought to the U.S. as children.

Lopez, who said he didn’t renew his spot in the program because he couldn’t afford it, hopes to benefit from new . . .

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Cooks, nurses guard inmates with US prisons down 6K officers

Nearly one-third of federal correctional officer jobs in the United States are vacant, forcing prisons to use cooks, teachers, nurses and other workers to guard inmates.

At a federal penitentiary in Texas, prisoners are locked in their cells on weekends because there are not enough guards to watch them. Elsewhere in the system, fights are breaking out, several inmates have escaped in recent months and, in Illinois, at one of the most understaffed prisons in the country, five . . .

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Ransomware gangs get more aggressive against law enforcement

RICHMOND, Va., (AP) — Police Chief Will Cunningham came to work four years ago to find that his six-officer department was the victim of a crime.

Hackers had taken advantage of a weak password to break in and encrypt the files of the department in Roxana, a small town in Illinois near St. Louis, and were demanding $6,000 of bitcoin.

“I was shocked, I was surprised, frustrated,” Cunningham said.

Police departments big and small have been plagued for years by foreign hackers breaking into networks and causing . . .

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